Simplicity and focus in 1-to-1s – ECB Coaches Association Conference review, part 1

I watched two coaching demonstrations at the ECB Coaches Association Conference – a batting session with Graham Thorpe and a spin bowling one with Chris Brown.

Both deployed a range of drills to challenge and develop specific skills, but, if I am honest, I wasn’t really that interested in the cones, hurdles and baseball mitts.

I was much more interested in hearing what the experienced coaches were saying to the player. Continue reading Simplicity and focus in 1-to-1s – ECB Coaches Association Conference review, part 1

On excellence – the quest for the perfect outswinger.

Back in the days when I played regularly on a Saturday afternoon, there was a standing joke among my team mates – that I was more interested in bowling the perfect outswinger than in taking a wicket.

And when I coach seam bowlers, once I am happy that their action is reasonably sound and repeatable, I will move on quickly to what might be considered by some to be post-graduate deliveries – variations in swing and pace – rather than drilling line and length.

I strongly believe that the role of the coach is to encourage excellence and the ambition to aspire to the extraordinary.

Always – what does “better” look like, and how can I be better?

Continue reading On excellence – the quest for the perfect outswinger.

How to Introduce Javelin to Young Athletes – from Coaching Young Athletes

If this works for teaching javelin (and I’m sure it does), perhaps there is something here for bowling?

I often see young cricketers struggle with “bowling from base” – they miss the all-important rotation from a basically side-on base to front-on release when there is no inherent forward motion – and the step-by-step approach might help to get them through this.

I’ll have to try this out – perhaps starting from “withdraw & throw”…with a straight arm, of course!

Coaching Young Athletes

Coach Young Athletes to Throw a Javelin in 6 Simple Steps

The following sequence can be used to introduce the javelin to beginners using either modified javelins (e.g. Turbojavs) or the real implement. I have used these teaching steps with class-sized groups of up to thirty children within a thirty minute session and with smaller groups and individuals.

Group Organization & Supervision

When teaching a throwing skill to large groups, ensuring the best use of the limited time available is vital. Maximizing activity time and organizing smooth transitions between activities is important if a throwing session with large numbers is to be productive. To ensure the athletes receive the maximum number of attempts, I aim to provide as many implements as possible. Therefore with a group of thirty participants, if I have fifteen implements, I will arrange it so that the athletes work in pairs, with fifteen of the group…

View original post 1,424 more words