The challenge of games – ECB Coaches Association Conference review, part 2

I have written previously about my conversion to games-based practice, but also about the challenges I have encountered when trying to design appropriate games.

So when I saw that Ian Renshaw, co-author of “the best book on non-linear pedagogy I have ever read”, and father (and coach) of Aussie opener Matt, was speaking at the ECB Coaches Conference, I knew I had to book in for his sessions straight away.

And with Professor Chris Cushion, speaking on the Challenge of Games, providing the (very necessary) counter-view to the “game as teacher” mantra, I had a lot of games-based learning to look forward to.

And I wasn’t disappointed.

Continue reading The challenge of games – ECB Coaches Association Conference review, part 2

Performance development is not just for “performance” athletes – podcast with Mark Bennett & Stuart Armstrong

Fascinating podcast from Stuart Armstrong with Mark Bennett MBE, founder of PDS (Performance Development Systems) .

Lots of take-aways for coaches from this, and their earlier podcast, not least the definition of “performance” as a behaviour or “state of being”, rather than a standard. For a coach working mostly with “participation” or “community” players, that means I could help them to develop appropriate performance behaviours to carry them onwards through their future careers, sporting or otherwise.

Continue reading Performance development is not just for “performance” athletes – podcast with Mark Bennett & Stuart Armstrong

Making sense of games with Principles of Play

I have posted previously on my conversion to games-based learning, and on the challenges of designing games that are both “representative” (of the real game, and that therefore require the players to develop transferable cricket skills) but at the same time not so constrained and artificial as to no longer be fun to play (the “game” element is important, because we want the players to come back to it again and again). Continue reading Making sense of games with Principles of Play