Categories
coaching cricket Girls’ cricket TGfU

Coaching for girls (and boys…and beginners…and everyone…) — half-term review

I have just completed a 6 week block of work visiting schools to deliver cricket-based PE lessons for secondary school-age girls.

With only three lessons with each class, there wasn’t going to be time to coach skills in any depth (even if this was appropriate for a PE lesson), so the emphasis was on introducing an understanding of the game of cricket (what is cricket? what skills are needed? what tactics might be needed?) and on engagement with the game (playing for the sake of playing).

Hence I aimed to play games in every lesson, and we finished with a “games-sense” session.

What follows is a look at the course structure — skills & games — and some of the thinking behind it, and a summary of how the lessons were received.

Categories
coaching cricket Games based learning session planning

Is the 100 too long? Maybe it’s time for the SIX!

What a finish in the World Cup Final.

Right down to the final ball, and the match is tied after 50 overs each.

Still tied after the Super Over.

Let’s quietly forget the “total boundaries scored” tie-break.

But that Super Over. All of the excitement of cricket, condensed into just 6 balls per team.

When the ECB’s 100 format was proposed, I had jokingly commented that it might still be a bit too long, and suggested that something akin to street20 might be the ultimate short format to “bring back the masses”.

Now, I wonder if there is something that can be lifted from the Super Over format.

So — the Teesra presents…

The SIX!

Categories
coaching constraint-led approach cricket Games based learning session planning

In the nettles. And other thoughts on backyard cricket rules.

Telephone call with the manager of one of the junior sections I coach. Two close games at the weekend, but in both we had lost by narrow margins after missing out on a lot of legside singles.

I received a lot of interesting replies to this tweet — targets to hit in drills, incentives for playing a stroke, penalties for not playing a stroke.

My own preference is to utilise some form of games-based approach, but with constraints for the players to adapt to.

So — the Teesra presents “the legside single game” aka “in the nettles”.