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coaching cricket session planning

Just watching some cricket…with a coaching twist, of course

With a tentative return to 1-to-1 practice in the nets, announced last week, cricket in England is at last beginning the slow march back, post-lockdown.

But no amount of nets, or online video drills or S&C, nor even SSGs and conditioned games as the lockdown loosens further, will make up for not playing much (any) actual cricket in 2020.

For the younger players (for all players, probably), the greatest loss will be game time, experience gained by simply playing the game.

Is there anything coaches can do to make up this deficit, whilst coaching remotely?

How about asking the players to just watch some cricket?

Categories
coaching cricket Games based learning session planning

Is the 100 too long? Maybe it’s time for the SIX!

What a finish in the World Cup Final.

Right down to the final ball, and the match is tied after 50 overs each.

Still tied after the Super Over.

Let’s quietly forget the “total boundaries scored” tie-break.

But that Super Over. All of the excitement of cricket, condensed into just 6 balls per team.

When the ECB’s 100 format was proposed, I had jokingly commented that it might still be a bit too long, and suggested that something akin to street20 might be the ultimate short format to “bring back the masses”.

Now, I wonder if there is something that can be lifted from the Super Over format.

So — the Teesra presents…

The SIX!

Categories
coaching constraint-led approach cricket Games based learning session planning

In the nettles. And other thoughts on backyard cricket rules.

Telephone call with the manager of one of the junior sections I coach. Two close games at the weekend, but in both we had lost by narrow margins after missing out on a lot of legside singles.

I received a lot of interesting replies to this tweet — targets to hit in drills, incentives for playing a stroke, penalties for not playing a stroke.

My own preference is to utilise some form of games-based approach, but with constraints for the players to adapt to.

So — the Teesra presents “the legside single game” aka “in the nettles”.