Rosenshine’s Principles of Instruction — 8.5 out of 10 ain’t bad

I posted last year on my understanding of Barak Rosenshine’s concept of “learner rehearsal” and how it might be applied in coaching.

Rehearsal is a key concept in Rosenshine’s 10 Principles of Instruction, developed in the context of teaching in the classroom. Leaving aside, for now, the question of whether coaching for (sports or movement) skill acquisition really does follow the same process as teaching an academic curriculum, Rosenshine’s 10 principles do (mostly) look to be applicable to sports coaching.

Continue reading “Rosenshine’s Principles of Instruction — 8.5 out of 10 ain’t bad”

Great Bowlers & Fielders — what was bowling like in the 1900s?

Before considering some of the individual bowlers featured in Beldam & Fry’s Great Bowlers & Fielders (henceforth Great Bowlers), I thought it might be interesting to take a look at the range of bowling styles that would have been on display in the early 1900s.

And it’s not quite what we see, today.

Continue reading “Great Bowlers & Fielders — what was bowling like in the 1900s?”